Skip to Main Content U.S. Department of Energy

STOMP

1995 Journal Articles

Investigation of density-dependent gas advection of trichloroethylene: Experiment and a model validation exercise

R.J. Lenhard, M. Oostrom, C.S. Simmons, M.D. White
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

Journal of Contaminant Hydrology 19:47-67, (1995).

Abstract

An experiment was conducted to evaluate whether vapor-density effects are significant in transporting volatile organic compounds (VOCs) with high vapor pressure and molecular mass through the subsurface. Tricholorethylene (TCE) was chosen for the investigation because it is a common VOC contaminant with high vapor pressure and molecular mass. For the investigation, a 2-m-long by 1-m-high by 7.5-cm-thick flow cell was constructed with a network of sampling ports.

Modeling fluid flow and transport in variably saturated porous media with the STOMP simulator. 1. Nonvolatile three-phase model description

M.D. White, M. Oostrom, R.J. Lenhard
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

Advances in Water Resources 18(6):353-364, (1995).

Abstract

STOMP is a multipurpose engineering simulator for investigating remediation technologies for the cleanup of volatile organic compounds and associated radionuclides within the soil and groundwater in the arid and semiarid western United States. The STOMP simulator is an integrated-volume finite-difference-based computer code for numerically modeling flow and transport through variably saturated geologic media. The simulator was written with a variable source-code configuration, which allows the execution speed and memory requirements to be apportioned to the problem specifics. This paper presents a brief overview of the unabridged simulator, with express attention to solution techniques for problems involving nonvolatile three-phase systems with hysteretic, fluid entrapment, and nonhysteretic relations for the relative permeability-saturation-capillary pressure constitutive functions. The phase-transition algorithms are demonstrated on a hypothetical problem that involves multiple NAPL appearances and disappearances. Mass-balance errors of less than 0.06% are reported for the simulation. In a companion paper, STOMP-generated saturations are compared against experimental data for two one-dimensional, nonvolatile three-phase flow systems.

Modeling fluid flow and transport in variably saturated porous media with the STOMP simulator. 2. Verification and validation exercises

R.J. Lenhard, M. Oostrom, M.D. White
Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland, Washington

Advances in Water Resources 18(6):365-373, (1995).

Abstract

STOMP, a subsurface flow and transport simulator for investigating remediation technologies, described in the preceding paper, is tested against simulation results form a published numerical code, MOFAT-2D, and against nonhysteretic and hysteretic data from three-phase flow experiments. There is good agreement between the STOMP and MOFAT-2D simulations and between measured data and numerical results when STOMP is used to simulate the experiments. However, there are some discrepancies between measured and predicted fluid contents. Discrepancies at low fluid contents are assumed to be a function of relative permeability-saturation relations, and discrepancies near complete wetting-fluid saturation are assumed to be caused by failing to account for a nonwetting-fluid entry pressure in the fluid saturation-pressure relations. Despite the discrepancies, overall predictions of subsurface fluid behavior are good. These results suggest that STOMP may accurately forecast multiphase-flow behavior at a site when the site is adequately characterized and the model parameters are correctly calibrated to the site.

STOMP

eSTOMP

Journal Articles

 

Contacts